All Posts tagged leading

Menu Review for Juvenile Justice

Client

One of Australia’s leading juvenile justice services providing secure and safe care of up to 500 young offenders.

Needs

Review adequacy of summer and winter menus to address concerns raised to the State by the public.
Ensure compliance with Nutrient Reference Values for Australia and New Zealand
Ensure compliance with Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents in Australia
Ensure compliance with Standards for Juvenile Custodial Facilities

Overview

Review of custodial health findings in various State jurisdictions around Australia and overseas.
Computer based macro and micro nutrient analysis of menus and individual recipes including protein, fat, carbohydrate and protein percentages
Computer based energy analysis of menus and individual recipes
Analysis of menus against nutrient reference values and appropriate recommendations.
Analysis of menus against dietary guidelines and appropriate recommendations
Analysis of food variety and appropriate recommendations
Analysis of special dietary needs and appropriate recommendations
Analysis of food choice and satisfaction and appropriate recommendations
Executive presentation

 

 

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World Cancer Day

Cancer is a leading cause of death around the world. WHO estimates that 84 million people will die of cancer between 2005 and 2015 without intervention. Each year on 4 February, WHO supports International Union Against Cancer to promote ways to ease the global burden of cancer. Preventing cancer and raising quality of life for cancer patients are recurring themes.

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Stress affects more women than men

About one in seven Britons feels under extreme stress, a survey suggests.We can reasonably conclude that these numbers will be similar right here in Australia. Experts say stress raises blood pressure, putting people at greater risk of stroke. A poor diet and lack of exercise also contribute to the chances of suffering a stroke. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Over 143,579 people die each year from stroke in the United States. Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States. Each year, about 795,000 people suffer a stroke. About 600,000 of these are first attacks, and 185,000 are recurrent attacks. Almost one in five women and one in 10 men feel their stress levels are out of control, according to the poll of 2,000 people in Britain.

depression

 

The survey, by the Stroke Association and the engineering company Siemens, found almost a fifth of people said they took no exercise. A similar number said they exercised for 30 minutes once a week. More than a quarter of people aged 45 to 54 said they never exercised, despite suffering the highest stress levels. Almost half said they were under more than “moderate stress”. Overall, 40 per cent of those surveyed said they were unaware of the link between exercise and lowering the risk of stroke.

James Beeby, of the Stroke Association, said: “The research is incredibly worrying and emphasises the need for people to be aware of the dangers of stroke. “It’s imperative that people take regular exercise and modify their diet to reduce the risk of suffering a stroke.” Siemens sponsors the British rowing team and provides some funding for the Stroke Association’s Stroke for Stroke campaign. Andreas Goss, the chief executive of Siemens in the UK, said: “Contrary to popular belief, stroke can affect people of any age.”

Originally Published in The Telegraph

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Dementia Can Be Avoided By Reading, Eating Well And Keeping Spirits High

According to the study published today in the British Medical Journal, the combined effects of reading, eating well and keeping spirits high would far outstrip the theoretical possibility of eliminating a gene known to increase the risk of dementia.

Dr. Karen Ritchie, a neuro-psychologist at the French National Institute of Medical Research leading her team of researchers assessed the change in the cognitive ability of 1,433 pensioners in Montpellier, over a period of seven years.

The participants in the study were asked series of questions regarding their lifestyle, medical history and educational background, including carrying out reading tests.

According to their findings, the amount of intellectual exercise a person indulges in greatly influences their likelihood of developing dementia.

Those with lower reading scores were 18% more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment or dementia, the former the forerunner of the latter.

Those suffering from depression were 10% more likely to develop it; while eating fruit and vegetables less than twice a day meant a 6.5% chance of developing dementia. Having diabetes was also a significant factor, leading to a 5% higher risk than those without.

In comparison, possessing a gene associated with dementia increased the risk by 7%.

These findings indicate intellectual activity to be the most important factor, which means the public health message should be to encourage literacy at all ages irrespective of innate ability.

Similarly, while the study found depression to be strongly linked to the development of dementia, treating it did not necessarily offer protection, nor was it easy getting people to eat more fruit and vegetables.

In conclusion, due to these problems, the most practical short-term solution was tackling diabetes, previous studies have also confirmed to be a causal factor. Obesity, high blood pressure and high cholesterol are other risk factors associated with the disease.

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