All Posts tagged general

Green leafy vegetables can cut risk of diabetes

“Fruit and vegetables are all good, but the data significantly show that green leafy vegetables are particularly interesting, so further investigation is warranted,” Carter said. “Green leafy vegetables contain antioxidants, magnesium and omega 3 fatty acids — all of which have been shown to have health benefits”, she added.

Each of the studies that Carter and her colleagues analyzed followed a group of adults over periods of 4-and-a-half to 23 years, recording how many servings of fruits and vegetables each participant ate on a daily basis then examining who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found no significant difference in diabetes risk with higher intake of vegetables in general, fruits in general, or combinations of vegetables and fruits.

Green leafy vegetables stood out, however, with an increase of 1.15 servings a day producing a 14 percent decrease in an individual's risk of developing diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is caused by the body's inability to adequately use insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, to regulate levels of glucose produced from food. Uncontrolled, the sugar levels rise and can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart and major arteries.

An estimated 180 million people worldwide have diabetes. The costs of caring for those with the disease are soaring in wealthy nations and becoming an increasing burden in developing countries too. Although there is no cure for diabetes, people with the condition can minimize their chances of getting sicker by being more active and losing weight.

Source: Reuters.

 

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Anxiety and Depression with a Gluten Free Diet

The team set out to examine levels of depression and anxiety between adults with celiac disease following a gluten-free diet and in control subjects drawn from the general population.

For their study, the team used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale to measure levels of anxiety, depression, and likely anxiety or depressive disorder, in 441 adult patients with celiac disease recruited by the German Celiac Society. They then conducted the same assessments on 235 comparable patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), either in remission or with slight disease activity. They did the same for the cross-sample control group of 441 adults from the general population.

The team used regression analysis to test possible demographic and disease-related predictors of anxiety and depression in celiac disease. Demographic predictors included age, sex, social class, and family status. Disease-related predictors included Latency to diagnosis, duration of GFD, compliance with GFD, thyroid disease.

The team found that female gender (P = 0.01) was the main predictor (R(2) = 0.07) of anxiety levels in patients with celiac disease. Female patients had a higher risk for a probable anxiety disorder (OR = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.3-9.4, P = 0.01) Patients who lived alone (OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9, P = 0.05) enjoyed a lower risk of anxiety disorder. None of the demographic and medical variables for which the team screened predicted either depression levels or risk for a probable depressive disorders.

Patients with celiac disease showed anxiety levels of 6.6 +/- 3.4, and those with IBD, anxiety levels of 6.9 +/- 3.7, both higher than the general population's level of 4.6 +/- 3.3 – (both P < 0.001). Depression levels were similar for people with celiac disease (4.2 +/- 3.4), IBD (4.6 +/- 3.4) and the general population (4.2 +/- 3.8) (P = 0.3). Rates of likely anxiety disorders in people with celiac disease were 16.8%, and 14.0% for IBD, both higher than the rates of 5.7% in the general population (P < 0.001). All three groups showed similar rates of probable depressive disorder (P = 0.1).

Their results provide strong indications that adult women with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet suffer higher rates of anxiety than persons of the general population. They encourage clinicians to provide anxiety screens for adult women with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet.

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General Information

Definition

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) was originally defined in 1988 when the Center for Disease Control (CDC) in the US brought together a number of researchers who had been investigating a strange syndrome characterized by overwhelming fatigue. This definition however was reviewed by a panel of international experts in 1994 and subsequently revised.

CFS is very difficult to diagnose because the main symptom of fatigue is present in so many other illnesses. However, once other illnesses have been ruled out through laboratory tests and physical examination, a diagnosis of CFS may be given if the following criteria are met:

Clinically evaluated, unexplained persistent or relapsing chronic fatigue that is of new or definite onset (i.e., not lifelong), is not the result of ongoing exertion, is not substantially alleviated by rest, and results in substantial reduction in previous levels of occupational, educational, social, or personal activities.The concurrent occurrence of four or more of the following symptoms: substantial impairment in short-term memory or concentration; sore throat; tender lymph nodes; muscle pain; multi-joint pain without swelling or redness; headaches of a new type, pattern, or severity; unrefreshing sleep; and post-exertional malaise lasting more than 24 hours. These symptoms must have persisted or recurred during 6 or more consecutive months of illness and must not have predated the fatigue.

The full text of the revised definition can be found at the CDC website: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cfs/about/definition/index.htm

Symptoms and General Information

Obviously, as is implied by the various names, fatigue is the major symptom in CFS. People often have the misconception that this is the only symptom and hence they assume that sufferers simply like to complain about the normal tiredness that everyone experiences after a day at work etc. CFS is actually much more than fatigue, and the fatigue experienced is a lot more severe than simple tiredness. The following is a list of the major symptoms of CFS.

  • Fatigue
    • Exercise Intolerance
    • Severe Malaise
    • Muscle and Joint Aches
    • Cognitive Dysfunction
    • Chronic Headache
    • Balance Disturbance
    • Recurrent Sore Throat
    • Mood and Sleep Disturbances
    • Abdominal Pain/Digestive Disturbances
    • Sensitivity to Light and/or Sound
    • Visual Disturbances
    • Skin Sensitivity

Possible Causes

The cause, or causes of ME/CFS are still not clear. There are a number of theories that have been proposed, the main ones propose the following factors as the cause or causes of the illness:

  • Viral Infection
  • Mycoplasma Infection
  • Immune or Endocrine Dysfunction
  • Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction
  • Environmental Toxins
  • Genetic Factors
  • Candida Overgrowth
  • Gut Dysbiosis
  • Heavy Metal Sensitivity
  • Emotional Stress or Trauma

There may be a large number of abnormalities in multiple body systems in CFS patients. These abnormalities centre around the nervous, endocrine and immune systems and the way these interact with each other. Although these abnormalities have been identified it is still unclear which are causes and which are effects. New research will hopefully shed more light on this but until then doctors who are seeing the best results with patients seem to be those who take a multifactorial approach and try to correct as many of the abnormalities discussed as they possibly can, using currently available treatments.

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Medicare Allied Health Initiative

While most private health funds provide rebates for visits to APDs, some patients may be eligible for a Medicare rebate instead.

The Medicare Allied Health Initiative allows chronically ill people being managed by their GP under the Enhanced Primary Care (EPC) Program access to Medicare rebates for ADP services. Eligible patients are those with a chronic condition, defined as one that is likely to be present for at least 6 months. This includes, but is not limited to, asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. General practitioners must be managing the patient through the GP Management Plan (GPMP) and the need must be identified as part of a Team Care Arrangement (TCA). (Please note these are not the only criteria for Medicare eligibility for a GPMP, TCA and referral.) The dietitian must provide a service that is directly related to the management of the patient’s chronic condition. General practitioners must then fill out the EPC Program Referral Form for Allied Health Services under Medicare for the rebate to be possible. The Medicare rebate is currently $48.95 per service with out-of-pocket expenses counting toward the extended Medicare safety net. Patients are given a maximum of five allied health visits per calendar year.

Medicare rebates are now also payable for group services for patients with type 2 diabetes, on referral from a GP. Contact Medicare for further information about eligibility, requirements, rebates and referral forms.

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