All Posts tagged avoid

Simple steps to prevent cancer

About a third of some of the most common forms of cancer could be prevented through healthy diet, physical fitness, and limiting alcohol intake, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund say in a new report. About 7.6 million people die from cancer every year worldwide, and 12.7 million new cases are diagnosed. According to the Union for International Cancer Control, a third of cancer cases could be cured through early diagnosis and treatment and 30% to 40% could be prevented. About 340,000 cases of cancer could be prevented annually in the U.S. if more people started eating a varied and healthy diet, started a regimen of physical activity, limited alcohol intake, and maintained a healthy weight, the new report says.

“Physical activity is recommended for people of all ages as a means to reduce risks for certain types of cancers and other non-communicable diseases,” says Tim Armstrong, MD, of the World Health Organization, says in a news release. “In order to improve their health and prevent several diseases, adults should do at least 150 minutes moderate physical activity throughout the week. This can be achieved by simply walking 30 minutes five times per week or by cycling to work daily.”

To reduce cancer risk, people also should quit smoking, avoid excessive sun exposure, and protect themselves against cancer-causing infections.

Tim Byers, MD, MPH, of the Colorado School of Public Health, says scientists urge Americans “to make the simple lifestyle changes of eating healthy food, getting regular physical activity, and maintaining a healthy weight to reduce cancer risk.” The World Cancer Declaration outlines 11 targets it says could be achieved by 2020 to fight cancer. These goals include: significant drops in global tobacco use, obesity, and alcohol intake; universal vaccination programs for hepatitis B and human papilloma virus (HPV); universal availability of effective pain medication; and efforts to dispel misconceptions about cancer. The health organizations say in a detailed report that the most common cancers in the U.S. and Britain are of the breast, colon/rectum, lung, and prostate.

The American Institute for Cancer Research recommends the following cancer-prevention steps.

  • Limit consumption of calorie-dense foods, particularly processed foods high in added sugar, low in fiber, or high in fat.
  • Avoid sugary drinks.
  • Eat more of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and beans.
  • Limit consumption of red meats such as beef, pork, and lamb, and avoid processed meats.
  • Limit consumption of salty foods and foods processed with sodium.
  • Dietary supplements for lowering cancer risk are not recommended.
  • Be as lean as possible without becoming underweight.
  • Be physically active for 30 minutes or more every day.
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New Diet: Imagine It!!!

New Diet: Imagine It!!!

Dieters often try to avoid thinking about the foods they crave, but maybe that's the wrong approach.Imagining yourself biting into a luscious piece of chocolate cake – thinking about the way it smells, the creamy texture of frosting on your tongue – may make you eat less of it, a new study suggests. This finding challenges age-old conventional wisdom that tells us thinking about goodies increases our cravings and ultimately our consumption, according to a study from Carnegie Mellon.

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Drawing on research that shows mental imagery and perception affect emotion and behavior, the research team – led by assistant professor of social and decision sciences Carey Morewedge – found that repeatedly imagining indulging in a treat decreases ones desire for it.

“These findings suggest that trying to suppress one's thoughts of desired foods in order to curb cravings for those foods is a fundamentally flawed strategy,” Morewedge said in a statement.

The researchers conducted five experiments in which 51 people were asked to imagine themselves doing a series of repetitive actions – including, in one experiment, eating different amounts of M&Ms. A control group imagined putting coins into a washing machine.

Subjects were then invited to eat their fill of M&Ms. Those who had imagined eating the most ultimately ate fewer candies than the others. Subsequent experiments confirmed the results.

The researchers say their results, which were published in the December 10 issue of Science, could have wide-ranging effects.

Says Morewedge: “We think these findings will help develop future interventions to reduce cravings for things such as unhealthy food, drugs and cigarettes, and hope they will help us learn how to help people make healthier food choices.”

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Processed Meat Linked to Bladder Cancer

 

The new data come from an ongoing National Institutes of Health-AARP study and involved more than 300,000 participants. Researchers found that those study participants who reported eating the most processed meat had about a 30 percent greater risk of bladder cancer than those who ate the least.

What's more, those whose diets were highest in nitrites and nitrates (from processed meat as well as other sources) were about 33 percent more likely to develop bladder cancer than those whose diets contained the smallest amounts of these compounds.

Bladder cancer is currently the 10th most common cancer in the US, with over 70,000 cases diagnosed each year.

Link to Bladder Cancer Needs Confirmation; Link to Colorectal Cancer Convincing

The evidence that consumption of processed meat is linked to colorectal cancer was judged convincing by the independent expert panel behind the major AICR/WCRF report, Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer: A Global Perspective.

This same report, published in 2007, found the evidence linking red and processed meat to bladder cancer too sparse to make a judgment. Although this new study's findings need to be confirmed, it represents a major contribution to the scientific literature on diet's role in bladder cancer.

Higginbotham noted that the AICR/WCRF report's findings are continually updated; data from this and other studies will be added to AICR/WCRF's database and are scheduled to be reassessed by independent experts in the future.

Until that time, AICR reiterates that for people who are concerned about cancer, there is already good reason to limit consumption of red meat and avoid processed meat.

Source: American Institute for Cancer Research

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High Fat Diet Can Make Asthma Symptoms Worse

Avoid eating meals high in fat, especially if you suffer from asthma, urges Australian researchers after finding the fat leads to inflamed breathing passages and hinders drug interventions.

Lisa Wood, PhD, research fellow and lecturer in the biomedical sciences and pharmacy department of Hunter Medical Research Institute, at the University of Newcastle, led the study with a team of researchers and presented their findings at ATS 2010, the international meeting of the American Thoracic Society, in New Orleans.

The researchers challenged 14 non-obese asthmatics and 16 obese participants to a high-fat diet (1,000 calories with 52%/60g of fat) of burgers and fried potatoes and another group of 16 non-obese asthmatics to eat a low-fat yogurt diet (200 calories, 13%/3g fat). “Induced sputum samples were collected at baseline and at 4 hours” according to the study's abstract.

“Subjects who had consumed the high-fat meal had an increase in airway neutrophils and TLR4 mRNA gene expression from sputum cells, that didn't occur following the low fat meal, ” said Wood.

She continued, “The high fat meal impaired the asthmatic response to albuterol. In subjects who had consumed a high fat meal, the post-albuterol improvement in lung function at three and four hours was suppressed.”

The researchers were surprised to find that the fatty diet also impacted the effectiveness of asthma medications, like albuterol. Wood added, “This is the first study to show that a high fat meal increases airway inflammation, so this is a very important finding. The observation that a high fat meal changes the asthmatic response to albuterol was unexpected as we hadn't considered the possibility that this would occur.”

It's unclear how and why fat not only inflames the airways but also prevents known asthma therapies from working. The researchers intend to design “more studies to investigate this effect. We are also investigating whether drugs that modify fat metabolism could suppress the negative effects of a high fat meal in the airways. If these results can be confirmed by further research, this suggests that strategies aimed at reducing dietary fat intake may be useful in managing asthma.”

Whether you have asthma or not is becoming increasingly more important for heart and now lung health to avoid the fat.

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Kids and food allergies

 

Tips for Managing Food Allergy

Get a professional diagnosis. Don't try to diagnose a food allergy yourself. If you suspect that your child has a food allergy, discuss this with your doctor. He or she can advise you accordingly and may refer you to an allergist for additional testing and treatment if needed. You should work with your doctor and/or allergist to develop an action plan for managing the allergy through indicating which foods your child should avoid, and possibly prescribing medication, such as an antihistamine or, for severe reactions, self-injectable epinephrine (EpiPen® or Twinject®).

Pass around the plan. Give your child's food allergy action plan to people who regularly see your child, including relatives, caregivers and their friends' parents.

See an Accredited Practicing Dietitian. An APD like Nastaran can help you and your child identify foods and ingredients to avoid, and develop an eating plan to ensure your child gets all the nutrients needed to grow and develop properly. For example, if your child is allergic to milk, the dietitian will recommend other calcium-containing foods and beverages.

Always read food labels. Always read food labels to see if the product contains any of the eight major allergens, or other ingredients your child is allergic to. Since food and beverage companies continually make improvements, read the label every time you purchase a product. Teach your child how to read labels, too.

Get support at school. Meet with staff at your child's school to review and distribute your child's food allergy action plan. At minimum, involve your child's primary teacher, the school nurse (if there is one), and key food service staff. Make sure all supervisory staff your child sees during the school day and during after-school activities have a copy of the plan. It is highly recommended that school administrators, teachers, and even food service staff are aware of the food allergy action plan in the absence of a school nurse.

Be cafeteria cautious. Go over the school lunch menu with your child to identify foods to avoid. Work with food service staff to plan substitutions or pack a lunch for your child to take to school. Remind your child not to share or trade food with others and make sure they know which staff can help if they have questions about a food, or if they have a reaction to a food. Be sure your school food service staff has copies of the School Foodservice and Food Allergies information sheet and review it with them when you talk to them about your child's food allergies.

Ask questions when eating out. Most life-threatening allergic reactions to foods occur when eating away from the home. Explain your child's situation and needs clearly to your host or food server—and teach your child to do the same when you're not with them. If necessary, ask to speak with the chef or manager. Some fast food restaurants provide a list of the ingredients in their menu items, as well as information on whether any of the eight major allergens are present.

Keep an allergy-safe kitchen. Rather than singling out your food-allergic child, prepare allergy-free recipes the whole family will enjoy.

Make peers “allergy allies.” Encourage your child to talk openly with friends and classmates about their allergy, what foods they must avoid, and what could happen to them if they don't. Suggest that your child enlist their friends in helping them “stay on the alert” for foods in question so they won't get sick.

Most importantly, be ready for emergencies. Teach your child the possible symptoms of a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis), such as difficulty breathing or swallowing, or tingling in the hands, feet, lips or scalp. If they experience symptoms after eating a food, make sure they know to immediately call 0-0-0 and, if prescribed by your allergist, use their medication to treat the reaction. If possible, have your child wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that identifies the specific allergy. Every few months, “role play” an allergic reaction to make sure your child knows what to do.

For more information and resources on managing food allergies see Nastaran or your doctor.

Source: International Food Information Council

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